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Recently Published Pieces

The Weeklings: Participation Trophy Politics

The Weeklings: Tiny Crowds, Tiny Hands vs. Huge Crowds, Huge Hearts

The Weeklings: Cheer Up, Trump Haters: It’ll Get Worse!

The Weeklings: The Dems Can’t Win if They Won’t Fight

The Weeklings: Thom Jones, The Pugilist at Rest (in Peace)

The Weeklings: Do Atheists Dream of Electric Sheep?

The Weeklings: Rich Assholes Paying No Taxes is Unpatriotic

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The Weeklings:  David Bowie, The Man Who Owned the World

The Weeklings: Bernin for You

The Weeklings: Hard To Get Over Lonely People

PopMatters: Reassessing Black Sabbath’s Unholy Trinity

Elephant Journal: On Loving & Losing Man’s Best Friends

The Weeklings: O’Connor and Coltrane: Saints of American Art

PopMatters: The 25 Best Classic Progressive Rock Albums

PopMatters: Edgar Allan Poe’s 10 Best Stories

The Weeklings: Over/Under the Volcano

Salon: On Losing Faith and Finding Myself

The Weeklings: Punch Drunker: The 50 Greatest Movie Fights of All Time

The Quivering Pen: My First Time

The Next Best Book Blog: Where Writers Write

The Weeklings: Stop Me If You’ve Heard This One Before

The Weeklings: The 50 Greatest Hockey Enforcer Names of All Time

The Weeklings: April 15, 1985: The Fight

The Weeklings: In Defense of Stephen King

The Weeklings: Sorry, Charlie

The Weeklings: What We Talk about When We Talk about Sex (in Fiction)

The Weeklings: The Problem with The Homeless Problem

The Weeklings: The Power of Political Narrative Part One (GOP)

The Weeklings: The Power of Political Narrative Part Two (DEMS) 

Punchnel’s: Mellow My Mind, or A Lesson in Life Imitating Art

Elephant Journal: Sanctuary, A Path Through Grief

PopMatters: We’ve Seen This Movie Before –Making Sense of Philip Seymour Hoffman

PopMatters: Bright Moments Past: On Music and Loss

Punchnel’s: A Spy in the House of Love

CEA Digital Dialogue: The Intersection of Art and Innovation: Looking at the Music and Book Industries 

FICTION
 
 
 
 
 

 

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The world of work, life, and love changed seismically in the early 2000’s and Sean Murphy’s narrator Byron, like everyone else, has been scrambling to keep up ever since…or wondering whether keeping up is even possible. In Not to Mention a Nice Life, Murphy’s masterful storytelling takes us on an honest, searing, sardonic ride through the decade that wasn’t.

 

-Jeremy Neuner, co-author of The Rise of the Naked Economy

May 22, 2015