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The Weeklings:  David Bowie, The Man Who Owned the World

The Weeklings: Bernin for You

The Weeklings: Hard To Get Over Lonely People

PopMatters: Reassessing Black Sabbath’s Unholy Trinity

Elephant Journal: On Loving & Losing Man’s Best Friends

The Weeklings: O’Connor and Coltrane: Saints of American Art

PopMatters: The 25 Best Classic Progressive Rock Albums

PopMatters: Edgar Allan Poe’s 10 Best Stories

The Weeklings: Over/Under the Volcano

Salon: On Losing Faith and Finding Myself

The Weeklings: Punch Drunker: The 50 Greatest Movie Fights of All Time

The Quivering Pen: My First Time

The Next Best Book Blog: Where Writers Write

The Weeklings: Stop Me If You’ve Heard This One Before

The Weeklings: The 50 Greatest Hockey Enforcer Names of All Time

The Weeklings: April 15, 1985: The Fight

The Weeklings: In Defense of Stephen King

The Weeklings: Sorry, Charlie

The Weeklings: What We Talk about When We Talk about Sex (in Fiction)

The Weeklings: The Problem with The Homeless Problem

The Weeklings: The Power of Political Narrative Part One (GOP)

The Weeklings: The Power of Political Narrative Part Two (DEMS) 

Punchnel’s: Mellow My Mind, or A Lesson in Life Imitating Art

Elephant Journal: Sanctuary, A Path Through Grief

PopMatters: We’ve Seen This Movie Before –Making Sense of Philip Seymour Hoffman

PopMatters: Bright Moments Past: On Music and Loss

Punchnel’s: A Spy in the House of Love

CEA Digital Dialogue: The Intersection of Art and Innovation: Looking at the Music and Book Industries 

 

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Please Talk about Me When I’m Gone, which pulled me in from the first page and never let go, is a mosaic love letter from a son to his lost mother, so everyone in the bereavement club should read it. But this memoir is also a thoughtful, compassionate meditation on being alive. I nodded in recognition, dog-eared pages containing lines I loved, felt my eyes well with tears. In the end you should read it for the reason anyone reads good writing: to feel less alone.”

—Jenna Blum, NYT best-selling author of Those Who Save Us and The Stormchasers

May 27, 2015